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Pink Collar: The Value of A Budding Stigma of Society

Pink Collar: The Value of A Budding Stigma of Society

Muskan Sharma

Why is there a distinguished “line” between male and female dominance in specific fields? Here, we discuss the pink collar more in-depth.

In this vast ocean of people, we have a variety of jobs and works. Almost every person on this planet has some job or the other, and hence to make it easy to understand we have different classifications of jobs as well. We have paid jobs, unpaid jobs or volunteering, formal sector jobs (pink collar), informal sector jobs, corporate jobs, government jobs, private jobs, etc. and among all these, there is one another type of segmentation of jobs, which is termed as collared jobs.

These are categorized on the basis of the type of job one does, or a grouping of individuals engaged in particular types of job. White-collar job (jobs paying higher average salaries for doing highly skilled work, and not by performing manual labor at their jobs), blue-collar jobs (jobs including labor classwork), etc. but recently we have seen an emerging category of collars, i.e., pink-collar jobs. Many people don’t even know if there is any such classification existing in this sea of jobs.

Pink Collar Workers

Pink Collar Worker

Pink collar worker is someone who works in the care-oriented career field. There are various such jobs which are either mainly reserved for females or have a majority of women employed. For example – receptionist, nursing, social worker, primary teacher, secretarial work, etc.  One can say that pink-collar jobs are indeed female-dominated. But this has another aspect also, which we are going to discuss later on.

Well, let us first discuss where and how this term originated. So the term pink collar was brought out in the 1970s by Louise Kapp, a writer, and social critic. It was termed to regard women working as nurses, teachers, secretaries, etc. the reason to term it “pink” collar was that neither were these jobs blue-collar nor could they grouped as white-collar, also they were majorly occupied by females. And since we all know how much of a prejudicial/stereotypical this color is. It is often considered a feminine color. So the reason to call pink-collar jobs so is quite evident.

During WWI, the military needed personnel to type letters, answer phone calls, and perform secretarial work. 1000 women worked for us navy as stenographers, clerks, and telephone operators. Similarly, military nurses are also a feminized and accepted profession for women only. During WWII, many American women were made to join the armed services and were stationed abroad or domestically through participation in non-combat military roles.

A typical job sought by women in the early 20tth century was of the telephone operator. Female secretaries were also popular, teachers in pre-primary, secondary schooling were also females even many women scientists were forced to take the position of high school teachers considering women were thought to be unfit to become scientists and well-read females were at best-given jobs of high school teachers.

Why and How did this Separation Start?

work separation
  1. Employers have an unsavory history of seeking out women to fill the roles/jobs for which they don’t want to pay much and since they knew men will naturally demand higher pays, they chose women to work for them, on their terms and conditions.
  2.  Female laborers were seen as a bargain for male laborers.
  3. To justify low wages and no benefits employees and the positions dominated by women as unskilled.

Why is the Female Dominance Present?

Female Dominance
Female Dominance

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Now one might think that, when so many sectors are male-dominated, if women are getting one particular sector for themselves, to rule or dominate it, then what is wrong? Isn’t it equality? Well, the answer to this is NO. Equality is not creating a separate space for women to dominate, as dominance can never be equality. In fact, what this shows is the social alienation of one gender. While what should happen is both men and women must get jobs in whatever field they want or whatever field they are fit for, irrespective of the society’s outlook on it. Every individual must get equal opportunities in all sectors.

It is time that we all see genders as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals.

Emma watson

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

See Also

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

Well, one answer to this is patriarchy. Men are conditioned in such a way, they are brought up to think that if they do jobs which are mainly done by females or need any amount of emotional quotient they will be proven less masculine. Further, one more reason for this was the low wages in these jobs, despite having equal hours of work, sometimes even more pink collared employees were paid much less than blue or white-collar employees. Also, the society didn’t let males enter this sector of work, to create a distinction between male and female, perhaps to keep their stereotypes alive.

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