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3 Reasons Why Eager Schools should not reopen

3 Reasons Why Eager Schools should not reopen

Anmol Gill

This article covers how schools shouldn’t opening in the fall because the virus will keep on spreading and it will be a continuous cycle. 

Schools shutting during Pandemic 

Middle School

Ever since summer has started, there is one question that has been circling around students’ heads: are schools re-opening in the fall for in-person classes? In March, schools started closing because of the coronavirus pandemic. With this question being asked by parents and students, several counties answered by announcing that they are reopening with some additional requirements for the safety of the students, according to NDTV. However, the astonishing part of this case is that each state closed schools with 50,000 cases, but are opening with around 4 million cases, according to CDC.  

Teacher’s on School Resumption Ideas 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall.  

On the other hand, parents are worried about their children going to school, but many districts are pacifying them by requiring masks and social distancing in order to maintain a healthy environment. However, staying six feet from each other is not possible because the classrooms are very small while the hallways are narrow, according to the Washington Post. 

In addition, adults cannot babysit and teach students at the same time because of the immense pressure. Mark Weber, a teacher who has taught all grade levels, claims that trusting students to stay away from each other is not enough to prevent the virus from spreading. He continues to say that wearing a mask the whole day is not realistic since taking it off is bound to happen at one point to take a gasp of fresh air. 

Furthermore, when elementary teacher Maxie Hollingsworth was asked about in-person classes, she responded with, “We have no air conditioning, which will make it impossible in the fall to wear face coverings in the heat, ” according to NPR.  She continues to say that wiping down materials and desks will be such a hassle on top of teaching and caring for the students. Even though children do not spread the virus as much as adults do, there is still a risk for parents to fret over.  

Schools Reopening and Government’s Role to Play 

While people are angry at their state government, the federal government is one of the crucial reasons why many students are going back to classes, according to New York Times. 

On Twitter, Trump threatened to “cut off funding if not open. ” He continued to say that schools in Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and Norway have opened with no problems. However, the coronavirus cases in those countries are significantly lower than in the United States. With the federal government pressuring states to reopen, it looks like life is going to go back to normal much later than expected.  

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

See Also

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

While some teachers are upset with schools reopening, others are quite happy because in-person classes will let them enforce rules and teach students the full curriculum instead of the condensed version. Erica Fuhrman, a teacher, claims that “distance learning didn’t work very well,” according to Live Science. She continued to say that many students did not show up the virtual sessions at the allotted times, making the process harder for her overall. 

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