Now Reading
Is the Concealed Appendix Really A Vestigial Organ?

Is the Concealed Appendix Really A Vestigial Organ?

Pranavi Bhattacharyya

For years now the appendix’s true purpose has been debated, find out whether it is a vestigial organ or not!

The Appendix

The alimentary canal is basically a long tube extending from the mouth to the anus. This tube has different parts, each part specialized to perform different functions.

The appendix is usually located in the lower right quadrant of the abdomen, near the right hip bone. The base of the appendix is located 2 cm beneath the ileocecal valve that separates the large intestine from the small intestine.

Basically, the appendix is a small finger-like projection that extends from the caecum (that is, the small blind sac that is found at the jejunum where the small intestine opens into the colon).

Still A Vestigial Organ?

Vestigial Structures: Evolution Definition
This image is according to old studies and research.

For a long time in the past, it was believed that the appendix was a vestigial organ and that it didn’t perform any function at all. Most of the people thought that the only thing the appendix was good for was getting infected and causing some serious pain when that happened.

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one.

Smith and her co-workers did make one interesting discovery: Species who had an appendix tend to have higher concentrations of lymphoid tissue in their caecum. According to Smith, this type of tissue can play a role in immunity, and can also stimulate the growth of healthy gut bacteria. So it makes sense, Smith says, that the appendix actually serves as a “safe house” for these beneficial bugs. This ”safe house” theory was first suggested in a 2007 study.

Are Appendixes Vital?

Unacademy on Twitter: "Recent research suggests that the appendix acts as a  secondary defensive organ, acting as a safe house for helpful gut bacteria  and contributing to the body's immunity. #MythBusters #MindBlown #

So what does this mean for people who have had their appendix removed? Luckily, not much. “In general, people who have had an appendectomy tend to be relatively healthy and not have any major detrimental effects,” Smith says. However, it is true that people without an appendix may have slightly higher rates of infection than those with a functioning organ. 

So to summarize, recent studies suggest that the appendix does have few important functions. They are mainly:

  1. It acts as a safe house for good bacteria which help in the digestion of food.
  2. After infection, it helps in the regeneration of good bacteria in the gut.

If one gets a viral infection or food poisoning, your digestive system throws out and flushes all the food and the good bacteria that stay inside. The appendix which contains this sample of good bacteria spills it out to help the good bacteria recover and regenerate once again.

Hence, clearly, the appendix isn’t a vestigial organ. There are a few vestigial organs, to date, present in the human body like the tail in the human embryo, wisdom teeth, nictitating membrane in eyes, etc., but certainly not the appendix.

Read more Science and Technology articles at The Teen Pop Magazine.

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

See Also

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

Heather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the journal Comptes Rendus Palevol, analysed the presence or absence of an appendix in 533 different mammals. According to her, the organ remains for a reason, she says – an adaptive one. eather F. Smith, PhD, associate professor at Midwestern University Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, has studied the evolution of gastrointestinal traits across different animal species. Her new research, published in the

What's Your Reaction?
Excited
0
Happy
0
In Love
0
Not Sure
0
Silly
0
View Comments (0)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

© 2021 The Teen Pop Magazine. All rights reserved.

Scroll To Top